September 2009 | www.eecl.colostate.edu

EECL E-Newsletter - Fall 2009
We are now solidly into the fall semester and excited to share some of our recent news with you. We continue to be busy, and excited about what this semester holds for our faculty, staff and students. We welcome a new cohort of graduate students, and we have introduced a few new and exciting research projects. For instance, our faculty and students are looking at the use of straight vegetable oil as a fuel, testing locally grown soybean, canola, and camelina sunflower oils and their biodiesels in a direct-injection engine and researching their impact on engine longevity, emissions and performance. Researchers are also hard at work characterizing engine performance, emissions and efficiency when engines are run on algae-based biofuels, while working to further unlock the chemistry of biofuels. Of course, we continue as field leaders in the areas of biomass cookstoves, and in the conversion of algae to energy. And, as national interest in the concept of smart electrical grids grows rapidly, the EECL and our InteGrid Test and Development Laboratory continue to be recognized leaders in this field, locally and nationally.

I encourage you to visit the EECL website (www.EECL.colostate.edu) for more information, and to update your contact information. Subscribe to our RSS feed and make sure that you're getting updates on our exciting developments. Please help spread the word by forwarding the e-newsletter to your colleagues, friends and family. If youd like to get information published in the newsletter or on our website, please email our Programs Manager, Mac McGoldrick at Mac.McGoldrick@colostate.edu. Thanks everyone - Have a wonderful autumn!

CSU start-up Solix Biofuels Featured in the New York Times
Solix Biofuels has partnered with the Southern Ute Indian Reservation in southwest Colorado to launch a commercial-scale production facility with the twin goals of making fuel and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from production facilities by maximizing the growth of algae.

For more information:

www.nytimes.com


Bryan Willson awarded the Maurice L. Albertson Medal in Sustainable Development
Village Earth, a non-profit organization founded by late Dr. Maurice Albertson of CSU, is dedicated to empowering villages to direct their own path of sustainable development, honored Dr. Bryan Willson with the Albertson Medal in August. Bryan was honored by this recognition and proud to share Maurice Albertson's global environmental mission.

To learn more, please visit:

www.news.colostate.edu

EECL Graduate named Acumen Fellow.
Sule Amadu arrived in the US from Ghana three years ago in August 2006. Between then and now, Sule was able to complete an MS in Mechanical Engineering, an MBA from the CSU College of Business Global Social and Sustainable Enterprise Program, and complete research here at the EECL, in Ghana, and India - all extraordinary accomplishments. Sule will spend the rest of this year and most of 2010 as an Acumen Fellow.


For more information, please visit:

www.news.colostate.edu

Popular Science asks "So you want to... fix the world's biggest engines?"
The EECL was featured in last month's Popular Science magazine in an article called "PopSci U: Seven of the Country's Coolest SciTech Courses." The article highlighted our unique capabilities to work on engines larger than you'll find in any other University research lab!


To read the article, please visit:

www.popsci.com

CSU Research Expenditures Hit a New Record in 2008-2009
Colorado State University received $312 million in competitive research support in fiscal year 2009, setting a new record for the university despite the economic downturn and increased competition for federal and private grant money. This represents the success of faculty, including many involved with the EECL, who have increased grant submissions by nearly 50% in 2008.

To learn more:

www.news.colostate.edu



Biofuels


Engine Emissions and Efficiency


Household Energy and Village Power


Renewable and Distributed Power Systems